Yes, Hate Has Consequences

“My mom literally just texted me ‘don’t wear the Hijab please’ and she’s the most religious person in our family….”

When we must choose between our safety and the freedom to be who we are, there is a problem. Following the election of President-Elect Donald Trump, there has been a substantial rise in the number of hate crimes being reported in the United States. Over 800 cases have been reported since Election Day, November 8th.

When President-Elect Trump used his campaign to call for a “total and complete shutdown of all Muslims entering the United States,” many Muslim-Americans began to fear for their lives. When he spoke about the entire African American community synonymously with this country’s inner cities, many in Black America felt silenced. To generalize an entire group of people under statements like, “You’re living in your poverty, your schools are no good, you have no jobs, 58 percent of your youth is unemployed — what the hell do you have to lose?” not only gave those outside of this community a false sense of all Black American lives, but disregarded the accomplishments and contrasting lifestyles of so many African Americans. In the same way, the President-Elect’s comments on Mexican immigrants as well as promises of a physical wall to keep them out of America have painted a detrimentally false narrative of Mexican Americans and immigrants in general.

President-Elect Trump’s comments are not the only ones to make sweeping and harmful assertions about entire groups of Americans. Vice President-Elect, Mike Pence has openly opposed equal rights for the LGBTQ community and has fought for public funding of so-called “conversion therapy”, a practice that has been deemed harmful to LGBTQ persons and rejected for decades by every mainstream medical and mental health organization.

The targets of these generalizations are primarily people of color and people who already feel vulnerable and isolated in this country due to the systematic oppression that thrives in America. Accordingly, when Donald Trump won the election, some Americans felt it validated his portrayal of people of color in this country. Statistically, the amount of reported hate crimes soared. A few of these cases, both reported and unreported, are exemplified in the following online posts.

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Image Credit: mashable.com

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Image Credit: facebook.com

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Image Credit: facebook.com

 

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Image Credit: Facebook.com

Even online, however, those sharing their stories are met with criticism. Still, there are online spaces that remain open and accepting. The victims of post-election hate crimes and allies have joined together to combat hatred through a variety of media from protests to online safe spaces. In these spaces, people have open discussions about how to deal with the increase in blatant racism, whether they are victims of it themselves or allies of these victims.

In a time that is leaving so many scared to merely exist as they are, advocates for survivors of trauma have extra work to do to provide trauma-informed help in this context. Two articles, listed below, are examples of helpful resources for survivors of trauma and their helpers.

“How to Cope With Post-Election Stress”

“I’m a therapist: Here’s how I help patients traumatized by the election.”

 

Dominique is a Hotline Crisis Services Specialist at the Action Alliance as well as an Intern for the Real Story journalism internship. She graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University with a B.S. in Mass Communications and a B.A. in African American Studies. She is an aspiring filmmaker and loves to create as well as watch others’ creations on the big screen.

The Real Story Internship analyzes and rewrites news stories to reflect a trauma-informed, survivor-centered and racial justice lens.

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Joining the Action Alliance adds your voice to making change in Virginia. Start your membership today or call 804.377.0335. 

To inquire about submissions for blog, please check the submissions page for requirements or email colson@vsdvalliance.org

Step Out of Your Comfort Zone to Protect Your Children’s Comfort

It is often said that growth lies on the other side of our comfort zone. It seems like every success story speaks about the great change that came about once the decision was made to step outside of the familiar. Sometimes we choose to step out of our comfort zone and sometimes we are pushed out. The latter is how some parents feel upon recent news coverage.

trumpsmallTo catch you up, over the past week, Presidential Candidate, Donald Trump has been under fire for comments he was recorded making some years back. In the recording, Trump describes sexually assaulting women in a tone that implies he sees nothing wrong with it. He alludes that he can do whatever he  wants to a woman because of his celebrity status. The presidential candidate was recorded bragging about his attempt to coerce a married woman into having sex with him, kissing women without waiting for their consent, and grabbing them by their vaginas, again, without consent.

 

 

The reason some parents are wary of the news coverage is the awkward situation it creates at home when kids are exposed to such a topic. However, these sorts of situations provide the perfect opportunity  for parents to step outside of  your comfort zone and talk to your children about consent: how to ask for and give consent, and how to recognize when it is or is not being given.

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picture credit: ChicagoNow

 

It may be awkward for both parties to begin, but the more it is discussed the easier it will become to speak about comfortably. Whether or not consent is spoken about in the home, children will learn about it. However, it is up to parents to openly and regularly speak with their children to ensure they are getting the right information regarding consent. If the conversation begins when they are young, it can shape the way they go on to view sexuality.

 

 

The Ask. Listen. Respect video and the Teach Consent website are here to help. These resources were created by the Action Alliance to help parents start conversations with your children about consent. Check out the downloadable Parent Discussion Guide here.

Dominique is a Hotline Crisis Services Specialist at the Action Alliance as well as an Intern for the Real Story journalism internship. She graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University with a B.S. in Mass Communications and a B.A. in African American Studies. She is an aspiring filmmaker and loves to create as well as watch others’ creations on the big screen.

The Virginia Family Violence and Sexual Assault Statewide Hotline is available 24/7/365 as are its live chat and texting options.

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Joining the Action Alliance adds your voice to making change in Virginia. Start your membership today or call.

To inquire about submissions for blog, please check the submissions page for requirements or email colson@vsdvalliance.org