2019 Act. Honor. Hope.

Each year, the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance hosts Act. Honor. Hope., an event to recognize individuals and groups who have gone above and beyond to turn the tide and support the development of safe, healthy, and thriving communities across the Commonwealth.

This year, we celebrate and honor the action of individuals and organizations that embody change and empower the communities around them to promote conditions in which every person can thrive. These agents of change provide an example for us all.

December 6, 2019 11:30 to 2:30pm, Virginia Crossings Hotel and Conference Center, Glen Allen, Virginia. Act. Honor. Hope. Member Celebration Luncheon honoring leaders who take extraordinary action to end sexual and domestic violence, and offer hope for a better tomorrow. Action Logo of two intersecting A's in gray and green.

This year’s honorees are:

An organization challenging racial injustice in Virginia by working to dismantle the youth prison model and promoting the creation of community-based alternatives to youth incarceration.

  • Carol Adams — Richmond City Police

Sgt. Adams’ foundation has become a resource center connecting domestic violence victims with services such as counseling and housing, serving the Richmond area’s historically underserved and unserved communities.

A tireless advocate for women’s rights, who, for the past 33 years, has nurtured and grown the Women’s Resource Center into an agency that helps 3,500 survivors each year, providing resources, advocacy, and education.

Del. Carroll Foy has devoted her life to public service and started a political action committee, Virginia for Everyone, aimed at supporting women of color entering political leadership. She has been a passionate advocate and spokesperson for ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment in Virginia.

Act. Honor. Hope. is an opportunity to celebrate the incredible work that has been accomplished this year by the honorees, join with advocates and allies from across Virginia, and raise the necessary funds to continue this critical work.

Please join us in HONORing these leaders who have taken extraordinary ACTION to bring about the change necessary to end sexual and domestic violence. Their leadership offers HOPE for a better tomorrow.

Act. Honor. Hope. will be held on December 6 from 11:30am to 2:30pm at the Henrico Ballroom at Virginia Crossings Hotel & Conference Center in Glen Allen, Virginia and will include lunch as well as a silent auction. Proceeds support the policy, prevention, and advocacy efforts of the Action Alliance. We hope you will join us and bring a friend! Purchase your tickets here by Nov. 22, 2019.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month (#DVAM) Across Virginia

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month (#DVAM). Though not officially observed until 1989, Domestic Violence Awareness Month has been observed since 1987, when it evolved from the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence’s first Day of Unity. Because of DVAM, sexual and domestic violence agencies spend every October not only mourning those we have lost and celebrating survivors of domestic violence, but also re-rooting in community and the values that we believe will ultimately end violence. DVAM is a time when anti-violence agencies dig deep and reach far, often planning their largest annual events and attempting to reach the broadest possible range of people with their work.

dvam map

This map shows various localities in Virginia offering Domestic Violence Awareness Month events and activities. To see the full clickable map, go here.

More than ever before, there is a collective feeling in the movement that we need “all hands on deck” to make sustainable, revolutionary change. In collaboration with our member agencies, we’ve created this clickable map resource highlighting DVAM events across the state in the month of October. Our hope is that this resource will help the general public plug into anti-violence work in their communities, garner support for sexual and domestic violence agencies’ fundraising and engagement efforts, and help agencies connect across regions.

We are energized by the scope of DVAM events in Virginia this month, which range from bike rides in nature centers, to art exhibits, to political actions on courthouse steps. The array of events is as multifaceted and diverse as our movement, and as Virginia itself.


Emily Robinson is the Development and Engagement Coordinator at the Virginia Sexual & Domestic Violence Action Alliance where she works with the Development and Outreach Team to support members and engage the broader community in the work of ending sexual and domestic violence in Virginia. 

Rectangle broken into two squares. Left square is a block with yellow in the background and white lettering that says "The Honeycomb Retreat: Art and Activism." The right block is a photo of about ten pieces of art work made with different media and utilizing different colors.

The Honeycomb Retreat: Art and Activism

This past July, the Action Alliance hosted its first ever Honeycomb Retreat, a social justice art and creative expression retreat. We brought together young people ages 17-23 from all around the state to come together to use art as a healing tool and as a form of activism. We framed art as a means to create social change, to envision a world free from intimate partner and sexual violence. With our group of 17 fellows, the participants, we convened with our three artists-in-residence— Hieu, Jackie, and Virginia— who acted as mentors in both art practice and implementing social change, and other activists, organizers, artists, and educators from across the country who facilitated workshops. The retreat was split between free art space and workshops, and the goal was for fellows to use what they learned or discussed in workshops and respond or reflect upon that topic in their art.

The Honeycomb Retreat aimed to connect with young people in Virginia, offer workshops on advocacy, healing and organizing, and build leadership opportunities within our state-wide coalition. The name Honeycomb was inspired by the idea of fractals, a pattern that repeats itself on both the small and large scale, as expressed by adrienne maree brown’s book Emergent Strategy:

What we practice at the small scale sets the patterns for the whole system. Grace [Lee Boggs] articulated it in what might be the most-used quote of my life: Transform yourself to transform the world. This doesnt mean to get lost in the self, but rather to see our own lives and work and relationships as a front line, a first place we can practice justice, liberation, and alignment with each other and the planet.


I was hired to help plan and organize the retreat in February. I was a senior double majoring in English and Art History at the University of Richmond and happened upon the intern listing via a school email. I was drawn in by the vision that the Action Alliance looked toward, a world in which all are free from gender-based violence by using an anti-racist framework. I had never worked in a non-profit and was nervous for what was to come in the following months. Nonetheless, I was excited to see where the retreat could go and how it would impact everyone who would be involved.


Art is an act of problem solving. This is a potent refrain stated by artist-in-residence Hieu Tran and later echoed by countless fellows throughout the retreat. The phrase suggests a refusal of passivity, something that one must engage in, a conscious and thoughtful action that must be done in order to find a solution. Both within the space and outside of the retreat, problem solving was required. The fellows collaborated on banners, prints, sculptures, working to overcome and undo any obstacles that they ran up against in the creative process. In much the same way, the Action Alliance Staff engaged in the same action, albeit not with banners but with planning workshops, space coordination, food donations, and more. All things Honeycomb Retreat were a whirlwind, and staff, fellows, and artists alike were nothing short of busy bees. The weeks and days leading up to it were a flurry of meetings, Target runs, and arts and crafts.


A group photo of 25 people all wearing the same gray t-shirts with a single yellow honeycomb piece posed together in about four rows.

Action Alliance staff, artists-in-residence, and fellows from the 2019 Honeycomb Retreat.

The Saturday before the retreat began, I attended a talk at the ICA (Institute of Contemporary Art) given by Gregory Sholette about the intersection of art and activism as it pertains to institutional critique. He described the practice of institutional critique as bringing visibility to. This resounded deeply as the retreat began and, in practice, we all began to consider what it meant to bind art and activism and what we were hoping to make visible. As it applies to art, activism is two-fold. First, deconstructing both the definition of what art is and what art can be. Second, what it can do.

The goal of the Honeycomb Retreat was to use art not just as healing practice but also as an organizing tool. We wanted to shift the perspective that art only existed in the sphere of self-service, as a remedy to burnout. As the week progressed, I think this shift became visible. One fellow remarked when prompted by the question what is art: It is expression. For freedom. For release. For honesty. For truth. Another stated that it is heritage, resistance, power, struggle, whatever you need it to be in that moment. We were crafting art to be whatever we needed it to be. Our artists-in-residence helped to encourage the idea that art could do something beyond just existing passively without thought. Jackie, Virginia, and Hieu all used their work across mediums such as illustrations, screen printing, or theatre to bring visibility to something. This act of bringing attention was consciously done in the hopes that the viewer on the other end would be moved, motivated, and/or inspired to create change. In a matter of days, the fellows were bringing their dreams of Black mystics, of the imagined tales of Lizzo and Reggie Jr (her trusty snake companion), of living unafraid, to the visual world via canvas, poetry, or paint.

The fellows started art-making timidly on the second day, the first day with partitioned time for art. They worked under the advice of the artists-in-residence, checking in about technique and composition. Some fellows painted a banner that Hieu conceptualized based on a Vietnamese board game. Others used printing blocks made by Jackie, such as a whale on a bicycle or a block declaring They/Them. And as they attended more workshops, on topics such as healthy relationships, sexual healing with plant medicine, and community care, they found what provoked or what moved them to expression. It was like we lit a fire, resulting in everyone trying to create as much as they could as time allowed.


Two people leading a workshop at the Honeycomb Retreat with posters hung on the wall in the background.

Emily Herr (left) and Raelyn Williams (right) facilitate a workshop at the 2019 Honeycomb Retreat.

One of my own sources of worry about the retreat was presenting a workshop. I wore a dress with a bee pattern for bravery, hoping that if I could ornament myself externally in the Honeycomb theme then, hopefully, I could internalize it as well. My workshop was on the history of museums and galleries and how that history is rooted in colonization, imperialism, and white supremacy which in turn shapes the modern-day institution that tokenizes marginalized people. I also had Richmond muralist Emily Herr as a co-facilitator to discuss what it means to create socially-conscious work and exist outside of the museum sphere. We wanted the fellows to learn that they could and should call themselves artist without trepidation. However, if the title felt awkwardly fitted, to still recognize that what they create can be impactful.

On our last day, Friday, after a barbeque out in the blazing midday sun with tabling from local organizations such as the Virginia League for Planned Parenthood, Side by Side, Health Brigade, and the Virginia Student Power Network, we closed with a visioning graphically facilitated by Emily Simons. One of the questions we asked our fellows was: “Based on the different art skills you built and the workshops you participated in this week, what do you want to do next? What are you excited for next? What’s your vision for a world without sexual and intimate partner violence?” and someone responded, Excited to see the change we are going to create. I love the duality in their use of create. Activism and art are both something that one creates out of a need for visibility, a deep desire to see change in the world. I am extremely thankful for the retreat and the ability to connect with so many amazing individuals. The Action Alliance has become a part of my hive and for that I am truly grateful.


Raelyn Williams is an intern at the Action Alliance with a passion for art and social change. 

Silhouette of a group of five people hiking on rocks. Text says, "The Action Alliance's 2nd Annual Empower Challenge. October 1st-8th, 2019. Empowering Survivors and challenging communities to build solutions to sexual and domestic violence."

Are You Up for the Challenge?

“Democracy is the best revenge.” —Benazir Bhutto

Join the Action Alliance from October 1-8, for this year’s (em)Power Challenge and help us build solutions to sexual and domestic violence.  The Challenge encourages both movement and movement building to raise funds for local sexual and domestic violence agencies who provide front-line support, advocacy, and prevention programming to survivors of violence and their communities.

So, grab a group of family, friends, and/or community members to move and talk together to envision a Virginia free from violence. Pick an activity – walk, run, bike, hike, scooter, shop—that matches your group’s mobility and fitness interests. Then, get moving and have a conversation about this year’s theme: civic engagement and voting.

Group of 11 people and two dogs wearing purple EmPower Challenge t-shirts in front an Action Alliance tent.

Action Alliance Staff ready for the (em)Power Challenge in October 2018.

We need public policies that make our homes, communities, and world a more loving and connected place for everyone. To make that happen, we need engaged community members who understand how policies impact survivors of sexual and intimate partner violence. Together, we can move one step closer in our collective journey towards building inclusive, safe, and health communities in Virginia. Join us in believing in a radically hopeful future and voting to make it happen.

Not sure how to get a conversation started? As a Team Captain, you’ll get the Walk & Talk guide to help you.

Registration is just $25 per person and when you sign up, you’ll also receive a special (em)Power Challenge t-shirt to raise the visibility of your group.

Two photos side by side. Left photo is of a dog on a leash with a purple shirt. Right photo is of the same dog's back with the same purple shirt on that says, "emPower Challenge."

Addie, wearing a custom-made emPower Challenge shirt, joins the staff for its walk.

Come together in a public display of solidarity in support of survivors and a Virginia free from violence!

Register today for #empowerchallenge.

P.S. Are you registered to vote? Be sure to check your voter registration or register to vote by October 15. Each and every vote makes a difference.

Act. Honor. Hope.

Please join the Action Alliance as we HONOR three leaders who have taken extraordinary ACTION to bring about the change necessary to end sexual and domestic violence. Their leadership offers HOPE for a better tomorrow.

Our Emcee for the event this year is:  Amanda Malkowski, co-anchor of Good Morning Richmond and 8News at 9.

This year we honor:

Delegate Christopher K. Peace and Senator Janet D. Howell

Delegate Peace, who has served in the House of Delegates since 2006 and Senator Howell, who has served in the senate since 1991 have together demonstrated bipartisan leadership and perseverance to secure an historic increase in sexual and domestic violence funding. Together they model an unwavering commitment to secure much needed funding to stabilize services, restore hope and build trust for survivors across the Commonwealth.

Fran Ecker, Director of Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services 

Ms. Ecker has been an exemplary steward in the development of the Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Grant Program that included the first-ever formula funding for sexual and domestic violence agencies. This funding was significant to stabilize sexual and domestic violence victim services throughout Virginia. Her active commitment to improving services for victims is evidenced by her accessibility and collaboration with those closest to the work and efforts to institute an efficient and responsive administration of funding so programs can focus on service delivery and program development rather than be buried in administrative burdens.

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We also honor and celebrate the commitment of these Action Alliance supports and welcome them as new Lifetime Members in 2016:

Dee Berry   –   Angela Blount   –   Liz Cascone   –   Richard (Tony) Cesaroni   –   Marva Dunn   –   Abigail Eisley   –   Aly Haynes-Traver   –   Sherre Hedrick   –   Kate McCord   –   Nancy Olgesby   –   Katherine Rodgers   –   Carla Ryan   –   Anna Claire Schellenberg   –   Karl Schellenberg   –   Rebecca Schellenberg   –   Richard Schellenberg   –   John Shinholser   –   Jennifer Underwood   –   Betsy Williams

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To purchase tickets to the event; please click on here

To see the silent auction items please go to  www.givetoactionalliance.org

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Joining the Action Alliance adds your voice to making change in Virginia. Start your membership today or call 804.377.0335. 

To inquire about submissions for blog, please check the submissions page for requirements or email colson@vsdvalliance.org