Rectangle broken into two squares. Left square is a block with yellow in the background and white lettering that says "The Honeycomb Retreat: Art and Activism." The right block is a photo of about ten pieces of art work made with different media and utilizing different colors.

The Honeycomb Retreat: Art and Activism

This past July, the Action Alliance hosted its first ever Honeycomb Retreat, a social justice art and creative expression retreat. We brought together young people ages 17-23 from all around the state to come together to use art as a healing tool and as a form of activism. We framed art as a means to create social change, to envision a world free from intimate partner and sexual violence. With our group of 17 fellows, the participants, we convened with our three artists-in-residence— Hieu, Jackie, and Virginia— who acted as mentors in both art practice and implementing social change, and other activists, organizers, artists, and educators from across the country who facilitated workshops. The retreat was split between free art space and workshops, and the goal was for fellows to use what they learned or discussed in workshops and respond or reflect upon that topic in their art.

The Honeycomb Retreat aimed to connect with young people in Virginia, offer workshops on advocacy, healing and organizing, and build leadership opportunities within our state-wide coalition. The name Honeycomb was inspired by the idea of fractals, a pattern that repeats itself on both the small and large scale, as expressed by adrienne maree brown’s book Emergent Strategy:

What we practice at the small scale sets the patterns for the whole system. Grace [Lee Boggs] articulated it in what might be the most-used quote of my life: Transform yourself to transform the world. This doesnt mean to get lost in the self, but rather to see our own lives and work and relationships as a front line, a first place we can practice justice, liberation, and alignment with each other and the planet.


I was hired to help plan and organize the retreat in February. I was a senior double majoring in English and Art History at the University of Richmond and happened upon the intern listing via a school email. I was drawn in by the vision that the Action Alliance looked toward, a world in which all are free from gender-based violence by using an anti-racist framework. I had never worked in a non-profit and was nervous for what was to come in the following months. Nonetheless, I was excited to see where the retreat could go and how it would impact everyone who would be involved.


Art is an act of problem solving. This is a potent refrain stated by artist-in-residence Hieu Tran and later echoed by countless fellows throughout the retreat. The phrase suggests a refusal of passivity, something that one must engage in, a conscious and thoughtful action that must be done in order to find a solution. Both within the space and outside of the retreat, problem solving was required. The fellows collaborated on banners, prints, sculptures, working to overcome and undo any obstacles that they ran up against in the creative process. In much the same way, the Action Alliance Staff engaged in the same action, albeit not with banners but with planning workshops, space coordination, food donations, and more. All things Honeycomb Retreat were a whirlwind, and staff, fellows, and artists alike were nothing short of busy bees. The weeks and days leading up to it were a flurry of meetings, Target runs, and arts and crafts.


A group photo of 25 people all wearing the same gray t-shirts with a single yellow honeycomb piece posed together in about four rows.

Action Alliance staff, artists-in-residence, and fellows from the 2019 Honeycomb Retreat.

The Saturday before the retreat began, I attended a talk at the ICA (Institute of Contemporary Art) given by Gregory Sholette about the intersection of art and activism as it pertains to institutional critique. He described the practice of institutional critique as bringing visibility to. This resounded deeply as the retreat began and, in practice, we all began to consider what it meant to bind art and activism and what we were hoping to make visible. As it applies to art, activism is two-fold. First, deconstructing both the definition of what art is and what art can be. Second, what it can do.

The goal of the Honeycomb Retreat was to use art not just as healing practice but also as an organizing tool. We wanted to shift the perspective that art only existed in the sphere of self-service, as a remedy to burnout. As the week progressed, I think this shift became visible. One fellow remarked when prompted by the question what is art: It is expression. For freedom. For release. For honesty. For truth. Another stated that it is heritage, resistance, power, struggle, whatever you need it to be in that moment. We were crafting art to be whatever we needed it to be. Our artists-in-residence helped to encourage the idea that art could do something beyond just existing passively without thought. Jackie, Virginia, and Hieu all used their work across mediums such as illustrations, screen printing, or theatre to bring visibility to something. This act of bringing attention was consciously done in the hopes that the viewer on the other end would be moved, motivated, and/or inspired to create change. In a matter of days, the fellows were bringing their dreams of Black mystics, of the imagined tales of Lizzo and Reggie Jr (her trusty snake companion), of living unafraid, to the visual world via canvas, poetry, or paint.

The fellows started art-making timidly on the second day, the first day with partitioned time for art. They worked under the advice of the artists-in-residence, checking in about technique and composition. Some fellows painted a banner that Hieu conceptualized based on a Vietnamese board game. Others used printing blocks made by Jackie, such as a whale on a bicycle or a block declaring They/Them. And as they attended more workshops, on topics such as healthy relationships, sexual healing with plant medicine, and community care, they found what provoked or what moved them to expression. It was like we lit a fire, resulting in everyone trying to create as much as they could as time allowed.


Two people leading a workshop at the Honeycomb Retreat with posters hung on the wall in the background.

Emily Herr (left) and Raelyn Williams (right) facilitate a workshop at the 2019 Honeycomb Retreat.

One of my own sources of worry about the retreat was presenting a workshop. I wore a dress with a bee pattern for bravery, hoping that if I could ornament myself externally in the Honeycomb theme then, hopefully, I could internalize it as well. My workshop was on the history of museums and galleries and how that history is rooted in colonization, imperialism, and white supremacy which in turn shapes the modern-day institution that tokenizes marginalized people. I also had Richmond muralist Emily Herr as a co-facilitator to discuss what it means to create socially-conscious work and exist outside of the museum sphere. We wanted the fellows to learn that they could and should call themselves artist without trepidation. However, if the title felt awkwardly fitted, to still recognize that what they create can be impactful.

On our last day, Friday, after a barbeque out in the blazing midday sun with tabling from local organizations such as the Virginia League for Planned Parenthood, Side by Side, Health Brigade, and the Virginia Student Power Network, we closed with a visioning graphically facilitated by Emily Simons. One of the questions we asked our fellows was: “Based on the different art skills you built and the workshops you participated in this week, what do you want to do next? What are you excited for next? What’s your vision for a world without sexual and intimate partner violence?” and someone responded, Excited to see the change we are going to create. I love the duality in their use of create. Activism and art are both something that one creates out of a need for visibility, a deep desire to see change in the world. I am extremely thankful for the retreat and the ability to connect with so many amazing individuals. The Action Alliance has become a part of my hive and for that I am truly grateful.


Raelyn Williams is an intern at the Action Alliance with a passion for art and social change. 

Introducing Brooke Taylor, UPLC Coach!

We are excited to welcome Brooke Taylor (they/them) to the Action Alliance staff! Brooke joined us in April as the new UPLC Coach!  

What excites you about the UPLC Program?

The UPLC (Underserved Populations Learning Collaborative) program is exciting for so many reasons! It provides dedicated time for Sexual and Domestic Violence Agencies (SDVAs) to discuss and investigate the ways that we serve marginalized populations within the state. Twenty agencies have been in an intentional process of examining their organizational practices as they relate to reaching communities of survivors that have been historically underserved. The UPLC gives an opportunity for local agencies to skill up together, inspiring deeper regional relationships. The ability to travel across the state and witness the fantastic work that our SDVAs are doing is a real privilege. Virginia is a beautiful state- whether in the hustle and bustle of NOVA, the scenic mountains of the southwest, the beaches and ocean views of the southeast, or the rolling hills of the central region, I always find myself surrounded by breathtaking scenery. Still, my favorite thing about this position is that I get to work with such fantastic comrades at the Action Alliance.

What is your favorite season and why?

Hands down, the answer is Autumn! The temperature is perfect- cool enough that I can walk outside without melting but not yet cold enough for snowstorms. While I can do without the pumpkin spice revolution, I love all the other classic pillars of Autumn: apple cider, Halloween, haunted houses/forests, and of course- SWEATERS! I also happen to think that few things can top the beauty of Autumn in Virginia; the color palette of nature is amazing. Fall serves as the official opening of both cuffing* and Big Boy* seasons, so it is always near and dear to my heart. Lastly, Autumn is the best season for sports lovers as it hosts the sports equinox, a time where the NFL, NBA, MLB, and NHL all are actively playing games. What more can you ask for?

Autumn in VA

A landscape scene of Fall foliage in Virginia, overlooking the Blue Ridge Mountains.  Image source: https://nature.desktopnexus.com/wallpaper/2032883/

Oh yeah, what about the obligatory introduction stuff?

Well, if we must…

I consider myself a social justice advocate above all else. For over a decade, I have worked toward equality for marginalized people who experience discrimination, poverty, incarceration, food insecurity, violence, and unemployment. I enjoy being an active member of the Richmond community and work closely with various organizations, particularly those at the intersection of social justice and faith. I earned a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Howard University and Graduate degrees from The School of Theology at Virginia Union University (MDiv, MACE). I identify as a Black, gay, progressive, non-binary person of faith. Outside of my role with the Action Alliance, I serve as a radio show host with Critiques for the Culture, an organizer for #Campaign4ComfortRVA, a Member Leader with the Richmond chapter of Southerners on New Ground, and a licensed minister with the United Church of Christ. When I have spare time, I enjoy cuddling with my partner and our gray tabby cat, Chimichurri.

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Close-up of Brooke’s cat, Chimichurri, relaxing on the sofa. Courtesy of Brooke Taylor.


*Cuffing season refers to the period of time, annually, where cold temperatures encourage folx to pair up until the spring emerges.

*Big boy season is a colloquial term for the time of year when masculine, larger bodied folx are popular in cuffing situation-ships.

Featured image: photo of Brooke Taylor, on a city street, smiling into the camera. Courtesy Brooke Taylor


Brooke can be reached at btaylor@vsdvalliance.org. Drop Brooke a line and welcome them to the team!

Meet Elizabeth Wong, Action Alliance’s New Development Director!

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A group of  approximately 20 people sit on the steps of the U.S. Capitol Building. Two of the members of the group hold a yellow banner with black print that says, “Housing Is A Right! Asian Americans for Equality”. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Wong.

Born into a family of activists who have advocated for the rights of Asian-Americans, housing rights, and workers’ rights, my parents instilled in me a strong sense of equality, justice, and service. My childhood was shaped by civic engagement, political campaigns, and community outreach meetings. So, I’ve always known that I wanted to work in the nonprofit sector. Throughout my career, I’ve worked to advance social justice and to ensure the voices of those who are often ignored by our society and government are heard and not forgotten.

After college, I moved to Richmond and spent more than a dozen years working for the ACLU of Virginia, which became my work family. I started in communications and fund development and through the years also learned advocacy, finance, operations, and strategic planning skills. During that time, I had the pleasure of working with many talented individuals across the country who share a passion for fighting for the rights and freedoms of others. I also grew to understand that all our major social issues are interconnected—housing, healthcare, education, racial justice, economic justice, gender equity, and anti-violence work. I’m excited to be a part of an organization that sees the intersection and interplay of these areas and is committed to improving everyone’s lives.

I’m excited to be a part of an organization that sees the intersection and interplay of these areas and is committed to improving everyone’s lives.

What lights you up about fund development as a tool for social change?

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Two people staff an information table at an outdoor event while two people approach the table for information. Behind the staff is a black banner with the ACLU logo in blue and white. Elizabeth Wong is one of the staff people at the table, and is standing and speaking to the people seeking information. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Wong

Social change requires a vision for a better future and resources to work towards that vision. I enjoy fund development because it helps put all the pieces together. It’s about building connections with people and inspiring others with the work you do. Enthusiastic, passionate program staff come up with great ideas to work towards this vision of a society without violence and they need the resources to make it happen. In development and outreach, my part is to bring more friends to the movement and raise investments to implement those creative and effective programs.

Basically, I just love hearing people’s stories and encouraging them to see what’s possible in the future.

Who is your favorite artist right now?

I may have a family bias, but my favorite artist is my aunt, Tomie Arai. Ever since I was a kid I’ve enjoyed her prints and murals. I especially love her pieces that combine photos of people and places with other textures. You can see life in each piece. Her art tells such important stories.

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Photo of an art exhibit by Tomie Arai. Four circular tables are set with red plates and napkins in a large open art gallery with chairs set at each table. One feature wall is painted deep red with Asian artwork and writing in gold. On the front of each chair is a black and white photo of a person. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Wong

If you were to be transported into a fictional world/universe, where would you go?

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A cartoon image of an elephant lying on its belly, wearing glasses and reading an illustrated book. Sitting next to the elephant is a pink pig, also reading a book. A yellow bird sits atop the elephant’s head reading a book. 

As a parent to a new reader I’m currently in the land of Elephant and Piggie. I love the simplicity of it—just hanging out with a good friend.  The stories talk about loving friendship, learning to be there for each other, and making way for new friends. In a world that is chaotic and filled with negativity, it’s wonderful to be in a space filled with positivity, empathy, and compassion, even if just for a short while. (Side note: While I think being a Chinese-American woman during this time would be challenging and less than fun, I’ve always been enamored with the Gilded Age of New York City. I’m pretty sure I lived in 1880s Brooklyn in a past life and walked across the Brooklyn Bridge after it was first built.)

Featured image: photo of Elizabeth Wong, sitting with her hands clasped, smiling and listening to a group discussion. 

 


Elizabeth can be reached at ewong@vsdvalliance.org. Drop her a line and welcome her to the team!

Meet Katie Moffitt, UPLC Coach!

We welcomed two incredible additions to the Action Alliance staff in May–both Coaches for our new Underserved Populations Learning Collaborative (UPLC). They are Quan Williams and Katie Moffitt. Two weeks ago we wrote about Quan, and this week we focus on Katie; keep reading for a bit of insight into the social justice roots that inform her tattoos and her hopes for her new position with the Action Alliance.

Katie, what’s your story?

I have an MSW and have been in the field for 8 years. I’ve worked as a clinician, adjunct professor, and as a preventionist at two local Sexual & Domestic Violence Agencies in Virginia. I love animals, baseball, playing trivia, cooking, gardening, cheese, collecting ice molds, making pun inspired Halloween costumes, and my friends and family.

freezercubes

Ice molds!

What is an UPLC Coach and what excites you about being a Coach?

Being a UPLC Coach is more than a job to me; it’s a calling. Having worked in the field for quite some time I’ve had the good fortune to work with a diverse group of people and have learned that everyone has something new and wonderful to contribute. I’ve also been witness to just how very real historical and systemic oppression are in our culture and how they’ve contributed to the reinforcement of violence.  The UPLC will allow us to work collectively to identify and address barriers while also enhancing the things we’re already doing well in order to better provide services to underserved populations.

If you were an animal/food/tattoo, what kind would you be and why?

If I were a tattoo I would be the ones I have currently and the ones I have planned. Each tattoo represents something, some idea, or people of importance to me. I have ants because I’m a dedicated Aunt to four awesome kiddos, the socioecological model (SEM) because of my time spent as a preventionist going upstream to figure out how to effect change on all levels of the SEM, dandelions for all of the survivors I’ve worked with and known over the years as a representation of the resiliency, potency, and beauty that they all possess, a fox for my godson and community in Winchester; and I’m working on a tattoo that will represent the importance of joy, silliness, brightness, and the simple pleasures in life as a reminder to balance self-care and service.

dictionfairy

Katie’s “dictionfairy” costume.

What’s one goal you have for the next year as the new UPLC Coach?

The UPLC provides a unique opportunity for us, not only to work with agencies from around the state, but to also bring everyone together to learn from each other. I’m excited to get to build relationships with everyone and enhance services for Virginia’s underserved populations. My main goal for the first year is to assist Sexual and Domestic Violence Agencies in the pursuit of creating a Virginia that is more inclusive, culturally responsive, and equitable to all of those in need of services.

triviateampic

Trivia team


To reach Katie, email her at kmoffitt@vsdvalliance.org. To learn about the UPLC project, visit our website here.

Welcome Quan Williams, UPLC Coach!

We welcomed two incredible additions to the Action Alliance staff in May–both Coaches for our new Underserved Populations Learning Collaborative (UPLC). They are Quan Williams and Katie Moffitt. This week we’re focusing on Quan; keep reading for a bit of insight into her hopes for her new position and a few everyday things that bring her joy. Stay tuned for Katie’s introduction in two weeks!

Quan Williams is a native of Chicago, Illinois, and was raised in Southern California.  She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from California State University, Northridge. In 2011, she graduated from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a Master’s degree in Urban Planning and Policy.  There, she received the Rob Mier Scholarship Award for urban planners committed to social justice for neighborhoods and residents. She is a class of 2015 graduate from the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University where she earned a Master’s Degree in Divinity.  Her professional interest is centered at the intersection of Public Policy and Advocacy.

What is an UPLC Coach and what excites you about being a UPLC Coach?

An UPLC Coach is a Project Coach for the Underserved Populations Learning Collaborative.

The UPLC is a partnership between the Action Alliance, the Virginia Department of Social Services, the Department of Criminal Justice Services and community sexual and domestic violence agencies to build capacity in providing culturally responsive and trauma-informed services and programs to underserved populations. We will do so by working directly with community sexual and domestic violence agencies to integrate social justice, racial justice, and changes in policy and practice at all levels of the organization.

What’s one goal you have for the next year as the new UPLC Coach?

One of my goals is to provide excellent support and technical assistance to the selected agencies that will participate in the project.

What’s your favorite accessory?

Scarves. I legit have dozens of scarves. One of the best things about a chilly day is wearing a wonderful scarf.

scarves1

Favorite magazine?

It’s a tie between Ebony Magazine & Time Magazine.

Favorite band?

The Roots. Hands down.  But Common’s new group August Greene is becoming a close second.

What do you do when you’re not working?

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Church events. Movies. Watching sports. Good August Wilson type theater. Live music. Learning to play the guitar. I’m also an amateur photographer with an old school manual camera; I specialize in black and white pics.  And I’m trying to improve my health and enjoy weight training.


To reach  Quan, email Quan at qwilliams@vsdvalliance.org.To learn about the UPLC project, visit our website here.

Justice. Healing. Liberation. 2018

From May 2nd through 4th, in Glen Allen, Virginia, the Action Alliance hosted our Justice. Healing. Liberation. conference for 140 advocates, law enforcement, preventionists, attorneys, case managers, and more. We held 32 workshops presented by over 40 presenters, a panel of 5 incredible storytellers, and 3 inspiring keynotes. Our conference included daily yoga sessions, two passionate performances by the Latin Ballet of Virginia, and a fundraising paint night hosted by Lynn Black from Paint for Good.

“[The conference] opened my eyes to struggles our clients go through and how we can help them cope with it.” -Conference attendee

We began on Wednesday, May 2nd, with a Trauma 101 session that offered our attendees a base understanding of different types of trauma, how trauma manifests, and its impact on the brain and body. Then, we dove into the nitty gritty. Attendees could choose from five different workshops during any time slot throughout the course of the day. Workshops covered topics from supporting human trafficking survivors, to looking at the intersections of trauma, oppression, and racial justice, and walking through a case study of intimate partner violence from the perspective of a law enforcement officer.

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Arianna Sessoms from James Madison University delivers a workshop about how to integrate racial justice practices into trauma response.

In the evening, the Latin Ballet of Virginia put on a vibrant performance that brought us back together as a group and re-energized us after a long day of learning. Our keynote, Dr. Dawn O’Malley, Fellow at the Child Trauma Academy, taught us about the history of brain science, and how critical the last 20 years of research have been for our understanding of how trauma impacts the brain. We concluded our evening with a dinner reception with distinguished guests, including Attorney General Mark Herring, Secretary of Health and Human Services, Daniel Carey, Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services, Gena Boyle, and Commissioner of the Department of Social Services, Duke Storen.

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The Latin Ballet of Virginia

Thursday was focused on the power of storytelling, and how telling our stories can be a critical step in the healing process for survivors, as well as a source of inspiration and guidance for those who have experienced similar struggles. We started out with another performance by the Latin Ballet, whose movement and music told stories of hardship and joy. We even had some audience members and Action Alliance staff join them on stage. Then our keynote, John Richardson-Lauve from ChildSavers spoke to us about how telling one’s story after a traumatic event can foster resilience.

“I just LOVED it.  The food was great, the workshops were very informative, the dancing entertainment was a breath of fresh air and the keynote speakers and panel discussion were inspiring.” -Conference attendee

Next, we hosted our “Storytelling as Transformative Justice” panel, with KJ Delgado from the Virginia Anti-Violence Project, Lieutenant Deuntay Diggs with the Stafford County Sheriff’s Office, Gaynell Sherrod from Virginia Commonwealth University, Rodney Lofton of Diversity Richmond, and Lisette Johnson, writer of Shameless Survivors. We were honored to hear these inspiring individuals share their stories, and learned about how stories can change hearts and move minds. The rest of the afternoon was dedicated to workshops focused on survivor stories, both heard and unheard. Participants had the opportunity to view and discuss the documentary Baltimore Rising, look at the intersections of sex education in the United States, and understand the process of fatality reviews in the state of Virginia.

 “The best part of this conference were all the different workshop options and what they brought to the table for learning, growth and discussion.” -Conference attendee

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Tiffany Turner-Allen from Ujima: The National Center on Violence Against Women in the Black Community

The final day of our conference was focused on emerging trends in the field of sexual and domestic violence, and shifting the way we respond to and prevent violence. Our keynote, Tiffany Turner -Allen from Ujima: The National Center on Violence Against Women in the Black Community, started the day talking about promising practices in “allyship” and her role in life as a truth-teller. This led into our workshop sessions that included topics like “Restorative Justice as a Tool for Healing from Abuse” and “Policing in the 21st Century”. We ended the day with some words of wisdom from our fearless Executive Director, Kristi VanAudenhove, who also happened to be celebrating her birthday the same day. We sang her happy birthday, enjoyed lunch and cake, and said our goodbyes.

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Happy birthday, Kristi!

These three days provided an incredible opportunity to connect, share, and inspire. For everyone who joined us, thank you so much for your energy, stories, and wisdom. We hope that you are able to take these lessons and discussions back to your communities, and we’ll see you in 2019 for our Biennial Retreat!

 


Laurel Winsor is the Events Coordinator at the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Social Justice at James Madison University in December, 2016.

Meet the Action Alliance’s new Prevention Director, Kat Monusky!

The Action Alliance is excited to welcome Kat Monusky to the team as our new Prevention and Community Wellness Director!

Kat has been working as the Prevention Program Coordinator at WCSAP—the Washington State Sexual Assault Coalition–for 7 years, during which time she has changed the landscape and evolution of prevention in Washington State. In this role, one of Kat’s priorities has been to bring the voices of local programs to statewide and national processes, and to make the significant funding and programming shifts necessary to ensure that coalition prevention work is responsive to the needs of local programs.

Kat has dreamed up and managed a variety of new statewide prevention initiatives from start to finish, including a multi-year pilot project on child sexual abuse prevention to push local programs out of their comfort zones and toward best practices and a new statewide Prevention Mentor Program. She has managed Washington’s large-scale, statewide Sexual Assault Awareness Month campaign for seven years, including the creation and distribution of materials, along with managing the WCSAP SAAM website and social media.

Kat and pups

In the realm of writing and publications, Kat has developed content for over 40 Prevention Tips, ‘special edition’ resources, and prevention pages of the WCSAP website. She has also been in charge of producing 11 volumes of WCSAP’s nationally-recognized “Partners in Social Change” (PISC) journal.

Kat’s connection to the work originated in Virginia. She was a survivor advocate while attending VCU as an undergraduate and in graduate school, and joined the Action Alliance Prevention Team as an intern in 2010. As Kat says, “My career began in working directly with survivors, and that experience keeps me grounded in the anti-violence and anti-oppression frameworks that guide my work.”

About her new position, Kat says, “I’m so grateful to have been able to learn from and grow with the amazing network of preventionists and advocates in Washington State. But I’m also so excited to return to Virginia and join the fantastic team at the Action Alliance! Looking forward to learning about the unique social change efforts that run through Virginia, and hopefully to meet many of you soon.”


Joining the Action Alliance adds your voice to making change in Virginia. Start your membership today or call 804.377.0335

Love wins

Love wasn’t on the ballot yesterday in Virginia, or anywhere in the nation. But love was present in our polling places and showed up in the ballot box.

We the people collectively made history yesterday, radiating love as we delivered an emphatic NO to hate, to violence, to racism and misogyny.

Make no mistake: this was not a victory for a party. It was not a victory for politics. Pundits who have been focused on what this means for Democrats and Republicans, who have been counting wins and forecasting seats and talking about how power is going to be divided still don’t get it. There was something else going on.

A new energy is emerging amongst us. It was an outrage to wake up just one year ago to the prospect of a national leader who had been transparent and unabashed about his racism, his sexism, his elitism, and the violence he had perpetrated against women. It was, and still is, untenable that such a person should be embraced by establishment politics and by the majority of white men (and many white women) in this nation as the best possible choice for the highest policy position in the land. It was an outrage; and it was also a clarion call.

We the people answered that call. In particular, people of color, young people, LGBTQ people and women, answered that call. Over this past year we channeled our anger into record numbers of marches, into organizing within faith communities and civic communities, and into educating ourselves.

We fought to restore faith in democracy and the power of the vote. We stepped up in record numbers to run for local and statewide office—because we wanted change, because we wanted incumbents to know that “politics as usual” was not acceptable, because we wanted others in our communities to have a choice.

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Many candidates persevered in the face of personal attacks based on racism, homophobia, transphobia, and anti-immigrant sentiments. Most candidates were running for the first time, most didn’t follow the usual scripts for preparing to run for office successfully—and every single one of them was a part of history yesterday, whether they won their particular race or not.

Their candidacies are testaments to their personal resilience and to the resonance of their platforms of justice, fairness, inclusion, equity, and caring for the long-term interests for all of us. In short, love.

We have been acting out of love for ourselves and each other as we organized over this past year, as we encouraged each other to step up and run for office, as we funded campaigns and promoted candidates and filled social media platforms with messages about the importance of voting.

Yesterday love won, and this is just the beginning. We will continue to fight for compassion and justice, for fairness and equity, for abundance and joy, for inclusion and community, and liberation and kindness…because we the people know that all of us deserve nothing less.


Kristi VanAudenhove is the Executive Director of the Virginia Sexual & Domestic Violence Action Alliance. 


Joining the Action Alliance adds your voice to making change in Virginia. Start your membership today or call 804.377.0335. 

In the Wake of Charlottesville: A Message to our Members

As our work week begins, here at the Action Alliance we are pausing to reflect on the violence that was perpetrated by predominantly male, white supremacists in Charlottesville over the weekend. Our hearts go out to our members, friends and colleagues who live and work in Charlottesville, and those who chose to travel from elsewhere in the state to join the counter-protest. You have our love and our compassion as you process and recover from the experience of being the targets of/witnessing hate-filled, identity-based violence. Those of you who work at the Shelter for Help in Emergency and the Sexual Assault Resource Agency are most especially in our hearts as you hold both the trauma of the racial and ethnic violence in your community with the violence that you confront in your work every day.

The images over the weekend of white supremacists shouting angry words, pumping their fists and raising weapons into the air looked far too familiar. In our work to end sexual and domestic violence we know that intimidation and violence are tools used by those who feel entitled to have power over others—especially when that entitlement feels threatened. We also know that there is no more dangerous time than the hours that follow a challenge to that controlling and violent behavior. We all witnessed this phenomenon as we watched one of the white men who had come to perpetrate racial violence intentionally drive a car into a crowd of anti-racists, taking a life and damaging countless more.

Twitter-Sofia Armen

Twitter/Sofia Armen

The lessons tens of thousands of us across the country have learned as we have taken on the work of trying to end sexual and domestic violence provide a filter through which we viewed the events of the weekend. We know that gender-based violence is rooted in oppression—and inseparable in both cause and effect from other forms of identity-based violence, most especially racism. Survivors have taught us that hateful language can sometimes leave deeper scars than physical violence. Perpetrators have taught us that it is not the behavior of their target that leads them to violence, but rather their own deeply held beliefs in their right to use violence to get what they want. Attempting to coordinate a community response has taught us that there is tremendous value in learning from our mistakes—taking the time to do a careful review of system responses when a life is lost to determine how those systems might have acted differently to prevent that loss of life and then making changes in the response.

Most of all we have learned that real power does not come from social status, from access to resources, from controlling others. Real power comes from truth telling. Truth telling about the history of our country, including our great Commonwealth. Truth telling about the origins and the impact of privilege, hate and violence. Truth telling from each of us about the harm that we have experienced—and the harm that we have caused.

…Real power does not come from status…access to resources…or from controlling others. Real power comes from truth telling…equity…and love.

Chip Somodeville-Getty Images

Chip Somodeville/Getty Images

Real power comes with equity. Equity is valuing all beings and all living things—letting go of our hierarchical notions that place some at the top of pyramids while others bear all of weight at the bottom. Equity is leveling the playing field for everyone—and celebrating all who choose to play. Equity is making reparations for harm caused by historical violence, including racism and ethnocentrism. Equity is seeing current injustice and making the changes it demands.

Real power comes from love. Love is compassion for ourselves and others. Love is forgiveness for ourselves and others. Love is naming violence and setting boundaries around behaviors—while holding open the possibility of rejoining the circle. Love is working together to build communities where children and adults can be curious, resilient, joyful, loving human beings able to respect and care for each other.

On behalf of all of us at the Action Alliance, take good care of yourselves and those in your close circle this week. Know that you are loved and the work that you do every day is making a difference. The Action Alliance will continue to work every day to end violence. Today we recommit to building racial justice; among our many efforts, we are partnering with Black Women’s Blueprint, Trans Sistas of Color Project, Black Youth Project (BYP100) and many other statewide groups to sponsor the March for Black Women September 30 in Washington, DC. We will soon be sending out a call for volunteers and support and we hope that you will join us.

In Peace,

The Leadership Team of the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance


Featured image source: Democracy Now

#Charlottesville #DefendCville #whitesupremacy #racialjustice


Joining the Action Alliance adds your voice to making change in Virginia. Start your membership today or call 804.377.0335. 

 

Meet Nina Aristy

Why do you do this Anti-Violence work?
There are endless reasons why I choose to do this form of work, and honestly the list gets progressively longer as I continue to do this work. I guess if we get to the core of it all I find comfort in the idea that nobody is alone and everyone is heard, therefore by doing this work I am working into that thought.

What would you like to learn your first year on your new job? 
That is a tough one. I think I have hit the backspace button too many times trying to get the wording right, because in all honesty I want to learn everything. I want to learn from the ground up on assisting individuals on a personal level (like all the folks in the hotline do so gracefully and empathetically). I would like to learn how we use that hotline data and then compound that into policy that will ultimately create safer spaces for victims. I want to learn how we communicate that to public in a matter that makes them impassioned and part of the movement. Basically I want to learn how to help. How I can make that chain of events that creates change, happen. I know it is a lot and most likely will not fit into my first year at this job, but I at least want those building blocks.

oscar-waoWhat is the latest book you have read and would you recommend it?
The latest book I have read is The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and I would absolutely recommend this book. I am a very proud Dominican, and I think if you want to get to know more about Dominican culture and history this is a nice introduction. Also, it is a very quick read, so if you are up for some laughs and a few tears and a genuine tale of a Dominican life both for natives and immigrants- this pretty much has that.

If you were a vegetable what would you be? Why?
I would probably be garlic. During the Winter I have to be far and away from the cold because I am easily frozen. I blossom in the Spring and always seem to show up in a group (I come from a big family so being alone is never an option). I am involved in a lot of things, just like garlic is involved in almost every meal.  I am not the biggest vegetable, but I do pack a punch in flavor (so I am notably unforgettable).

What are the 3 things you love about Virginia?

  1. The lifetime full of memories I have made here with the people that became my family.
  2. The food. Honestly, I have gained about 10 pounds since I got here and I do not regret a single bite that has lead me to gaining it.
  3. The advisers and mentors I have had that have supported and guided me.

nina-grouping

If you had one box for all your stuff, what would you put in it?
I would put my boyfriend, my whole family (especially my beautiful nephew), all my friends, and my doggies

What is the most incredible view you have ever seen?
I guess this is sort of cheating, but at the same time it does answer the question. The most incredible view I have ever seen is always changing because it is moment, not particularly a fixed place or person. These moments happen very rarely and spontaneously, for me it has happened only a handful of times. It is this moment where you feel like everything is just right. You are with the right people and the right mindset and everything just comes into focus. For me this has happened while singing in cartoon voices with my partner during a 6 hour drive at midnight. It has happened while surrounded by my friends in my college living room just telling past stories of our lives. Those moments where I do not need a picture or a journal entry to remind me of what I felt, who was there, or what was said in order for me to picture that exact moment in its entirety. Those for me are the most incredible views I have ever seen.

Lastly, what excites you most about your new job at the Action Alliance? 
I am excited to get to know everyone and help in different tasks and projects. I am just very excited to get to learn from everyone here.

Nina recently graduated from the University of Richmond with a BA in Political Science. She minored in Women’s Studies and Latin American studies. Currently, she is studying for her LSATs and aspires to do legal assistance and advocacy for sexual and domestic violence victims. 

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Joining the Action Alliance adds your voice to making change in Virginia. Start your membership today or call 804.377.0335. 

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