The Super Bowl, Suppression, and Survivorship

In the late hours of Sunday, February 4th, and the early hours of the following Monday, the Eagles fans took to the streets of Philadelphia to celebrate their hometown’s first-ever Super Bowl win. A lot happened—cars were flipped, police and civilians were injured, street poles were ripped out of the ground, fires were started, and property was destroyed. What’s even more noticeable, however, is what didn’t happen—authorities did not fire tear gas or shoot at the unruly crowds, police dogs were not brought in, and media outlets did not use rhetoric laced with negative connotation to describe the rioting football fans.

Instead, although the Philadelphia Police Department’s presence was heavy, the city congratulated the Eagles, the mayor—as well as the city’s fire commissioner—encouraged fans to celebrate safely, and the police sergeant said it would be great if fans could go home. While this may seem like the expected and natural response—I mean, police exist to keep citizens safe, after all, right?—it serves a sharp contrast to ways police responded to similar gatherings of large crowds of predominantly people of color.

In fact, that very same morning before the Super Bowl, Minneapolis police arrested people gathered to protest police brutality. While the protest and the celebration riots occurred within 24 hours of each other, responses were strikingly different—especially considering that the Black Lives Matter protest was not harmful to any civilians or property.

Unfortunately, this is not an isolated case. For years, protests against police brutality, racism, and sexism have garnered violent police responses – even when the protests themselves are peaceful. It appears that outraged responses to people of color protesting are not a matter of public safety, but rather another tactic to suppress the voices of people of color. One needs to look no further than responses to athletes simply kneeling during the National Anthem to protest police brutality to see that even the most peaceful forms of protest by people of color or in support of people of color are still condemned and shut down.

Just as people of color are automatically faced with blame, white folks are almost immediately given the benefit of the doubt for their actions. The large groups of white folk rioting after the Super Bowl were not immediately assumed to be “thugs” or “terrorists”—instead they were thought of as passionate sport fans, perhaps a little overzealous at most.

When people of color and allies are constantly met with more police brutality and racially charged rhetoric by media outlets, and frequent blame, they are robbed of their voices and their opportunities to speak out time and time again. A culture where people of color’s voices are constantly suppressed leaves us with several problems as a society—namely, a cycle of more violence against people of color.

Over time, with white people not being held to the same level of accountability and with people of color silenced, the power scale gets further tipped for the favor of white people. This power difference increases the risk factor for sexual violence and intimate partner violence, as it creates the opportunity for abuse of power. Silencing the voices of people of color when they stand up for justice only makes it even more difficult for people of color who are survivors of sexual and intimate partner violence to speak up about their experiences and receive support. This becomes even more agonizing when the abuser holds more power and is therefore less likely to be held accountable.

As a society, we should strive for a culture of racial equity that holds all individuals to the same degree of accountability and ensures that all voices—especially those of survivors—are heard loud and clear.

Featured image: Getty Images: https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a15839429/eagles-fans-crisco-poles-fight/


Maryum Elnasseh is a second-year student at Virginia Commonwealth University, where she is double-majoring in journalism and political science, with a concentration in civil rights. At the Action Alliance, Maryum is an intern for the Real Story Internship. She hopes to use her voice as a tool to ignite social change. 

 

I Deserve a Hero Who Looks Like Me

Loud. Angry. Desperate.

Leave it to mainstream media and anyone encountering me would think that those words describe me because the media continues to portray Black women as characters that play into common stereotypes.

“We’ve seen the drugged-out mother storyline in Losing Isaiah and Moonlight. We saw Mo’Nique beat her daughter and throw a baby down the stairs in the film Precious; and [Taraji P.] Henson as a pregnant prostitute in Hustle & Flow. We saw a woman allow her children to [be murdered by their father] in For Colored Girls; and Octavia Spencer and [Viola] Davis as domestics in The Help.”1

In fact, the American Advertising Federation and Zeta Phi Beta, a historically Black sorority, released a white paper featuring the 8 most frequently cited African-American female stereotypes. On this list included “the hood rat,” “the desperate single,” “the angry Black woman,” and “the mammy.”

During an interview with Variety, former first lady, Michelle Obama, commented on this issue stating, “for so many people, television and movies may be the only way they understand people who aren’t like them.”

This lack of positive representation leads those who don’t live in communities with positive representations susceptible to assumptions, stereotypes, and biases.

But the harm doesn’t stop there. According to Nielsen, a global information, data, and measurement company, Black TV viewers watch roughly 57 more hours than white viewers (averaging 213 hours per month) and Black women watch 14 more hours of TV per week than any other ethnic group.

Teenage girls and young Black women (who are 59% more likely to watch reality TV) are constantly seeing how we are portrayed in the media and looking up to this as the standard. Or we aren’t seeing Black women at all and feel isolated.

In September 2017, the Action Alliance hosted a Black Women’s Town Hall. This was a chance for our community to come together and discuss issues that we face. Heartbroken, Virginia Delegate Delores McQuinn recalled the moment that her granddaughter was vocal about the lack of representation of Black women:

“My 3-year-old granddaughter came to me recently on a Sunday night,” she started. “‘Gilo, I wanna be white. I want their hair and I wanna be a princess.’ I stayed up all night that Sunday night. My granddaughter has an environment where everything is afro-centric. Pictures of Black women on the walls, statues, doll babies, books. She goes to a predominantly African American school… We’re talking about pulling down monuments which she may or may not see, and all of us have televisions in our homes that they see every day. How can we say to the system that we demand that Black women and African American people are reflected [positively] in the school books and on television?”

Seeing Black women as educated, successful, and respected (both in the media and in person) has a huge effect on the way young Black girls see themselves and their roles in society.

“When I come across many little Black girls who come up to me over the course of these 7 1/2 years with tears in their eyes and they say ‘thank you for being a role model for me. I don’t see educated Black women on TV and the fact that you’re First Lady validates who I am,'” Obama reminisces.

lupita

Actress Lupita Nyong’o giving her acceptance speech at the Oscars
 Image Source: https://www.buzzfeed.com/alannabennett/reminders-that-representation-really-is-important?utm_term=.ek6wOb58KK#.rfDEO3wZ11

 

Like Obama, Virginia Delegate Delores McQuinn and several other Virginia legislators are putting themselves in a position to not only be positive public figures for Black girls but to also improve the Black community as a whole.

Delegate McQuinn, Senator Louise Lucas, Delegate Jeion Ward, Senator Jennifer McClellan, and Delegate Jennifer Carroll Foy have introduced a number of bills this year to increase racial justice and food justice and prevent the trauma-to-prison pipeline, including:

  • a program to provide funding for the construction or expansion of grocery stores in underserved communities (Del. McQuinn, House Bill 69);
  • the restoration of voting rights for those convicted of nonviolent felonies (Sen. Lucas, Senate Joint Resolution 5); and
  • eliminating the requirement that principals report certain misdemeanor incidents to local police ( Foy, House Bill 445)

McQuinn is inspired by strong and successful Black women like civil rights leader, healthcare executive, and health activist Roslyn Brock. She wants to ensure that the Black girls in her community have a plethora of positive Black role models to guide them, including herself.

Not only is McQuinn a Delegate for Virginia, but she is also the Chair of the Richmond Slave Trail Commission, a minister in Henrico County, VA, and has dedicated her time to advocating for the development of an African American History and Slave Trade Museum in Richmond, Virginia.

 

To ensure that she is having a lasting impact on the lives of children in her community, McQuinn started a nonprofit: the East End Teen Center. The Teen Center has been providing a six-to-eight-week Writing Institute to 11 to 15-year-olds in Richmond Public Schools for the last ten years.

While at the Writing Institute, students are able to improve their reading and writing skills, gain self-confidence, and develop a love for learning and storytelling. At the end of the session, the students’ writings are compiled into books and published.

Our girls deserve to see Black women like this in the media. Our girls deserve positive role models. Our girls deserve to see positive representations of themselves when they turn on the TV.

Strong. Educated. Caring.


1Kerwin, Ann Marie. “The ‘Angry Black Woman’ Makes Real Women Angry.” Ad Age, 27 Sept. 2017, adage.com/article/media/angry-black-woman-makes-real-women-angry/310633/.


Ki’ara Montgomery is a recent graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University with a Bachelor’s degree in public relations, and minors in business and gender, sexuality, and women’s studies. She is currently working with the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance as Member and Donor Liaison.

 

 

Virtual Legislative Advocacy Week Is Here!

Join us online for statewide Virtual Legislative Advocacy Week (#VLAW18)! Starting Monday (the week of February 5-9), we will #AmplifySurvivorVoices and take to Facebook, Twitter, email, and phones to advocate for policies that enhance violence prevention and education, improve services for victims and communities, and support offender accountability.

You must register for Virtual Legislative Advocacy Week to gain access to our 2018 Virtual Advocate’s Toolkit, a handy interactive document which offers legislator contacts, sample messages and scripts, images, infographics, and strategies for how best to engage your legislators.

Why is legislative advocacy important?

Lawmakers can’t be experts on all issues all the time. Who are the experts on sexual and intimate partner violence? People who have been directly affected by sexual and intimate partner violence–and the professionals who help them–which is us! It’s our job to make sure that lawmakers who vote on issues affecting survivors are knowledgeable about the issues before they vote.

VLAW logo-red coverIs legislative advocacy a good use of my time?

Yes…because lawmakers listen to their constituents. Pretty much every contact you have with a legislator and/or their staff is noted in order to keep track of where constituents stand on any given issue. Lawmakers want to be accountable to their constituents…and it’s also in their best interests to do so. Plus, your voice/ knowledge/point of view is worth sharing!

Action Alliance Policy Priorities for the 2018 General Assembly Session

We know that the voices of survivors are amplified when advocates speak out. Take a look at our legislative priorities for the 2018 General Assembly session. See what issues resonate most with those you serve in your agency, which policies may have a direct impact in your area, and how you can contact your legislators and law makers in your area to advocate for changes that are trauma-informed and center the safety, privacy, and dignity of survivors.

Newcomer to legislative advocacy? This webinar’s for you!

If thoughts of interacting with your legislators terrify you, or trying to keep up with the legislative process throws you into a tizzy, this webinar (presented in PowerPoint style with voice prompts) may help you navigate some of the murky waters of the General Assembly.

You will be guided through learning about how Virginia’s government functions, how bills flow through the legislative process to become laws, and how to stay informed through the process. Click here to access the presentation.


Joining the Action Alliance adds your voice to making change in Virginia. Start your membership today or call 804.377.0335